18th May David Kershaw Model Maker

David Kershaw has always loved makings and uses wood, brass, plastic and electronics in his work.   There seems to be various levels of accomplishment in the model making world.    From Bought plastic kits ready to be painted, through models made from Scratch ( all the parts made by hand), to Museum standard models that are too good to be played with in case they got damaged.   David placed himself in the middle of the range, making some things from scratch, buying in other peoples failures from E Bay, but not achieving museum standard of finish.

The Gun Carriage was made from scratch.   He had made a jig to ensure that all the wheels were the same size, and that the axel was in the middle.     A brass tire was added to hide the method of manufacture.   To a chainsaw carver this seems very fiddly work, but he manages all his work on a small table, whereas my workshop extends the whole of the basement and is still crowded.

David showed us two boats.   The Fire boat was an E Bay wreck which needed to be stripped of paint, have certain repairs , and some parts made from scratch.   The other boat he is making to plans and he described the problems of this sort of work,   It is so easy to get the keel out of line, as the glued on pieces may exert strong forces pulling the whole boat slightly out of shape.      He will sail these boats in Heywood with the Mutual Model Boat Society , from 9.30 to 12 on Sundays.   He says he prefers boats to airplanes as planes crash more frequently .      A trick of the trade?  He used a curtain ring as a life Lifebuoy!!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

David has a web site that shows the process of building a boat www.perkasa.co.uk .

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The gun carriage was built from scratch.   A kit would have cost £30, would not have a solid brass cannon, and would not have been half as much fun to make

 

 

 

27th April Walking Sticks -Nick Pantelidies, John Adamson, Stewart Hood

Three members showed us the way that we have made walking sticks.   These were sticks meant to be used rather than show pieces made to the exacting standards of the British Stickmakers Guild.       Nick showed us the proper way of making stick!!    A potential stick should be collected in Jan or Feb, allowed to dry out bit so that shrinkage has happened, straightened whilst there is still some moisture in the stick, and a handle attached.  There are lots of designs for stick handles in magazines, but do check that the illustrated handle is the right size for your stick.  The stick can be made from such odd things as brussel sprouts  stems and bamboo.   The joint of the handle to the stick needs to be strong.   Nick recommended a quarter inch hole in handle and stick, and a threaded bar.   Adrian Carter suggested using a washer that fits the diameter of the stick, to help find the centre of the stick when drilling.    Make sure that the handle meets the stick without a gap, and that they meet smoothly.   Use Araldite glue or similar, only glue rod into the handle first, and protect the outer surface from excess glue with some masking tape.    Drill a small hole at the bottom of the hole that will hold the threaded bar in the stick, to allow the excess glue to escape.    The stick needs a ferrule of some sort and can be finished with whatever you have.

John Adamson showed us another way, he collects his sticks ready made from the hedgerow, and uses them without any straightening.   It is just a matter of being there at the right time ( a minute before the other chap), and having your eye in for sticks.    It helps to go somewhere that is likely to have plenty of sticks.  His favourite place is besides a railway line where some ash trees were clear felled some years ago.     For a ferrule he uses shot gun cartridges.      If he finds a wonderful stick handle that needs a stick, he fixes it on to a commercially available metal walking pole.  These have the advantage that they can be collapsed down and fit into a suitcase.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Stewart Hood showed us some of his wonderfully carved walking poles.      May be a bit too heavy for actual use but a good talking point

 

 

 

 

24th March Show at Hollingworth Lakes Visitor Centre

The Club was invited to exhibit our work at Hollingworth Lakes Wood festival.     It was a lovely sunny day but with a sharp wind at times.  Some stalwarts stewarded the show outside all day and they look cold in the photos.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Others stayed inside, and looked happier

 

16th mar A.G.M and Sale of Surplus Tools and Wood

 

 

 

Before the A.G.M. there was time to chat and carve.      Our A.G.M was a very quick and civilised affair.   We gave our thanks to the committee members and officials who had kept the club running last year , and to the members who had taken on the work for the new year

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

There was a large selection of wood, tools, and books for sales and some great bargains were had

16th Feb Sean Dyche portrait in 5.5 hours by John Adamson (member)

John had been asked to carve a portrait of Sean Dyche, manager of Burnley Football Club, on a tight budget.      The wood was a standing tree stump in a pub yard.      Photographs of Sean Dyche with his mouth shut are rare.   John managed to get a front view, but the side view had an open mouth.      It took some juggling to get the two photos printed to the same size.

 

 

 

 

 

 

The carving was started with a chain saw and continued with some very large chisels , gouges, and a mallet made from a crown green bowling ball,  that John keeps just for large chain saw work

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The finished work was given a red beard and eye brows by another artist.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

John had taken photographs of each stage of the work so members could see the whole process

 

 

 

20Jan Amber, Jet, Jade, and Ivory. Talk by Gill Smith (member)

Gill Illustrated her talk with slides and souvenirs from her holidays.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Amber is a fossilised tree resin that is easy cut by hand or with a flexible shaft tool.    Usually a rich yellow but can be red or blue.   If it happens to have an insect trapped in it, then the value rockets.     We were shown some photographs of the amber rooms in St Petersburg where whole rooms are covered in carved amber.     Warning – There is fake amber on the market.

Jet  is fossilised Monkey Puzzle tree, rather like coal.    It has been used for jewellery since Roman times, became very popular in Queen Victoria’s reign, and has come back into fashion through the Goth movement.     It is illegal to mine it, but it can be picked up (if you are very lucky) from the beach after storms.     It is soft but brittle and takes a high shine.

Jade comes in various colours green, lavender, red, yellow, white and black.      It is very hard and can only be shaped with abrasives.   It has been carved in China from the Neolithic Period (c. 3000–2000 b.c.e) onward.   In early times the abrasive used was sand which can be worked into the jade with a wood or copper tool, now diamond tipped tools are used.   We were shown a carved ball with more balls inside, and Nick Pantildes explained how this was done .

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ivory from elephants is now a restricted material, so most examples date from before the laws about sale of ivory were enacted.     Ivory can also be obtained from  walrus, and mammoths.      There is also false ivory which is a resin based material.    One interesting fact was that elephants are evolving, and tusks are getting smaller because the gene pool for the larger tusked elephants has been reduced by poaching.

Saturday 16th June. Ray Ashton, a retired woodwork teacher talking about Wood and Machines

I worked out that Ray is about 90, and he had a wealth of knowledge of how wood has been used.      He started as mater craftsman, but saw an advert for woodwork teachers in the Manchester Guardian, applied and got the job.     He retired early as teaching was no longer but occupation it had been.   His talk was of woods he had used, where they came from and jobs they had been for.     It is difficult to write a detailed report of his talk as it ranged over such a wide