24th March Show at Hollingworth Lakes Visitor Centre

The Club was invited to exhibit our work at Hollingworth Lakes Wood festival.     It was a lovely sunny day but with a sharp wind at times.  Some stalwarts stewarded the show outside all day and they look cold in the photos.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Others stayed inside, and looked happier

 

16th mar A.G.M and Sale of Surplus Tools and Wood

 

 

 

Before the A.G.M. there was time to chat and carve.      Our A.G.M was a very quick and civilised affair.   We gave our thanks to the committee members and officials who had kept the club running last year , and to the members who had taken on the work for the new year

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

There was a large selection of wood, tools, and books for sales and some great bargains were had

16th Feb Sean Dyche portrait in 5.5 hours by John Adamson (member)

John had been asked to carve a portrait of Sean Dyche, manager of Burnley Football Club, on a tight budget.      The wood was a standing tree stump in a pub yard.      Photographs of Sean Dyche with his mouth shut are rare.   John managed to get a front view, but the side view had an open mouth.      It took some juggling to get the two photos printed to the same size.

 

 

 

 

 

 

The carving was started with a chain saw and continued with some very large chisels , gouges, and a mallet made from a crown green bowling ball,  that John keeps just for large chain saw work

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The finished work was given a red beard and eye brows by another artist.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

John had taken photographs of each stage of the work so members could see the whole process

 

 

 

20Jan Amber, Jet, Jade, and Ivory. Talk by Gill Smith (member)

Gill Illustrated her talk with slides and souvenirs from her holidays.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Amber is a fossilised tree resin that is easy cut by hand or with a flexible shaft tool.    Usually a rich yellow but can be red or blue.   If it happens to have an insect trapped in it, then the value rockets.     We were shown some photographs of the amber rooms in St Petersburg where whole rooms are covered in carved amber.     Warning – There is fake amber on the market.

Jet  is fossilised Monkey Puzzle tree, rather like coal.    It has been used for jewellery since Roman times, became very popular in Queen Victoria’s reign, and has come back into fashion through the Goth movement.     It is illegal to mine it, but it can be picked up (if you are very lucky) from the beach after storms.     It is soft but brittle and takes a high shine.

Jade comes in various colours green, lavender, red, yellow, white and black.      It is very hard and can only be shaped with abrasives.   It has been carved in China from the Neolithic Period (c. 3000–2000 b.c.e) onward.   In early times the abrasive used was sand which can be worked into the jade with a wood or copper tool, now diamond tipped tools are used.   We were shown a carved ball with more balls inside, and Nick Pantildes explained how this was done .

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ivory from elephants is now a restricted material, so most examples date from before the laws about sale of ivory were enacted.     Ivory can also be obtained from  walrus, and mammoths.      There is also false ivory which is a resin based material.    One interesting fact was that elephants are evolving, and tusks are getting smaller because the gene pool for the larger tusked elephants has been reduced by poaching.

Saturday 16th June. Ray Ashton, a retired woodwork teacher talking about Wood and Machines

I worked out that Ray is about 90, and he had a wealth of knowledge of how wood has been used.      He started as mater craftsman, but saw an advert for woodwork teachers in the Manchester Guardian, applied and got the job.     He retired early as teaching was no longer but occupation it had been.   His talk was of woods he had used, where they came from and jobs they had been for.     It is difficult to write a detailed report of his talk as it ranged over such a wide

17th March Annual General meeting

17th Feb 2018 Carving for Towneley Park nature Trail by Richard Colbran (Member)

The notes below have been taken from the Towneley News 2018

Smallholdings Trail

This nature trail was instigated by a Park Ranger about seven years ago, in collaboration with the Friends of Towneley Park. It provides an easy walk of about 3⁄4 mile, on good paths, starting opposite Riverside Car Park entrance.

There are ten marker posts around the trail, each capped with a carving representing a natural creature which might be seen nearby, namely speckled wood butterfly, heron, fox, frog, swallow, toadstool, rabbit, wren, dragonfly and hedgehog. The carvings were done by members of Lancashire and Cheshire Wood Carvers, but inevitably the weather has taken its toll, and some rot has set in.

During last summer, remedial work was started, involving three members from both groups.     Two carvings which were beyond repair (one having been vandalised by a woodpecker!) have been replaced and re-sited away from overhanging trees, to help the wood to dry out more quickly. The other carvings have been patched up, with some re-carving and use of filler. More new carvings are under way to replace any further write-offs.

One outstanding feature on this trail is the flowering of the Southern Marsh Orchids in late May or early June, and this is said to be the most northerly habitat for this plant. Riverside Car Park has picnic areas, toilets and a refreshment kiosk, as well as a children’s play area to enjoy on your return.